LINDNER & MARSACK, S.C. NAMES DANIEL FINERTY AS EQUITY PARTNER

Daniel-FinertyWe are pleased to announce the advancement of Daniel Finerty to Equity Partner.

Finerty joined Lindner & Marsack in 2012 and concentrates his legal practice on representing and counseling clients – including Wisconsin counties, cities, school districts, Native American tribes, tribally-owned businesses and private sector employers – in labor and employment litigation and compliance matters in front of administrative agencies; in federal, state and tribal courts; and in labor arbitration. He works across a broad spectrum of industries including senior living, healthcare, manufacturing, food manufacturing, hospitality, retail, transportation, construction, commercial laundry, dry cleaning and others.

“Since Dan joined our team, he has consistently and determinedly worked to provide an outstanding, cost-effective platform for both new and existing clients and their insurance partners to address their toughest legal challenges,” said Thomas Mackenzie, Firm President. “Clients trust and appreciate his commitment to helping manage their workforce and continued growth while always keeping an eye on costs.”

Finerty has a great deal of experience defending senior living providers in Wisconsin Health Care Worker Protection Act retaliation claims; Wisconsin Fair Employment Act discrimination, retaliation and harassment claims; unreasonable refusal to rehire worker’s compensation claims; and other claims that follow termination of an employee for a violation of resident rights’ policies and other misconduct. He has also handled hundreds of employment claims involving Employment Practice Liability Insurance (EPLI) as panel counsel as well as at his clients’ request with a carrier’s permission and has defended Native American communities facing employment-related claims by current and former employees in tribal courts.

Rated AV Preeminent by Martindale Hubbell and recognized among the Best Lawyers in America in Appellate Practice since 2010, Finerty has also been regularly recognized by Wisconsin Super Lawyers magazine as a five-time “Rising Star” earlier in his career and as a “Super Lawyer” each year since 2014.

“I’m proud to be an integral member of this team and also to play an important role in the continued success of my clients, to whom I owe a debt of gratitude for their ongoing support, collaboration and confidence,” said Finerty.

GOVERNOR WALKER PROPOSES TO ELIMINATE THE LABOR AND INDUSTRY REVIEW COMMISSION

By:  Jonathan T. Swain

February 13, 2017

In his recently published proposed biennial budget for fiscal years 2018 and 2019, Governor Walker has proposed to eliminate the Wisconsin Labor and Industry Review Commission (LIRC).  LIRC is an independent three member commission appointed by the Governor that currently handles all appeals of Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) decisions for unemployment compensation cases, worker compensation claims, as well as state fair labor standards cases and fair employment cases in the Equal Rights Division and public accommodation cases.  LIRC would be phased out over the next three fiscal years.

Presently, LIRC has the authority to affirm, overturn and remand ALJ decision in these areas.  LIRC decisions are appealable to the State’s circuit courts.

Under Governor Walker’s proposal, Worker Compensation ALJ decisions will be reviewable by the State Department of Administration, while jobless claims and Equal Right Division decisions will be Agency administrators.  In his budget statement, Governor Walker stated that the proposed elimination of LIRC will eliminate “an unnecessary layer of government” and will make this second layer of review decisions occur much more quickly.

Of course, this is a proposed budget and, as such, is subject to negotiation with the legislature and subsequent amendment.  Further, stakeholders in the business, labor and legal community have yet to weigh-in on the Governor’s proposal.  As this issue advances, we will keep you up to date and informed.

Employers Must Now Use New Form I-9

NEW I-9 FORM AVAILABLE: As of January 22, 2017, employers must use the NEW version of the Form I-9 — whether for new employees or for the reverification of expiring authorizations for existing employees. Prior versions of the Form I-9 should no longer be used. Employers who do not use the new Form I-9 are considered to be in technical violation of the law and can expose themselves to penalties for each occasion they have failed to use the new form.

If you have questions or concerns about I-9 compliance or need assistance in conducting an I-9 compliance audit, please contact Sally Piefer at spiefer@lindner-marsack.com or at 414.226.4818, or any other attorney you have been working with here at Lindner & Marsack, S.C.

2017 Worker’s Compensation Gamble

Lindner & Marsack’s worker’s compensation defense practice is well recognized as an industry leader in providing work injury defense services to many of Wisconsin’s largest employers and insurance carriers.

Doug Feldman heads the Firm’s highly regarded work injury defense team and is a founding Board Member and current President of Kids’ Chance of Wisconsin.  Kids’ Chance is a non-profit organization that provides college scholarships to children of seriously injured workers in Wisconsin.

Kids’ Chance of Wisconsin is presenting a complimentary half-day worker’s compensation seminar on March 9, 2017 at Potawatomi Hotel and Casino, followed by a networking cocktail hour and raffle.  This year’s presenters include many of the top administrators from the Worker’s Compensation Division and Labor & Industry Review Commission.  Funds raised at the event will directly support the Kids’ Chance mission of providing financial support, in the form of scholarships, to children of parents who have been seriously injured at work.

If you are interested in attending this event, click Kids’ Chance of WI – Here’s The Deal Seminar – March 9, 2017 for more information.

Lindner & Marsack owes much of its success to its good friends and clients in Wisconsin and is proud to support this worthy endeavor and give back to the community in such a meaningful way. We hope you will consider joining us for this educational opportunity.

2016 Super Lawyers

Lindner & Marsack, S.C. proudly announces that seven of its attorneys have been acknowledged as 2016 Super Lawyers or Rising Stars by Super Lawyers Magazine.  “We appreciate the support of the legal community and our clients in acknowledging the quality of the legal services we provide,” said Thomas W. Mackenzie, President of the firm.  He added, “the Super Lawyers designation is a way to recognize the accomplishments of attorneys who work hard every day to find solutions to the problems confronting employers.  We have a great team.”

The individual attorneys recognized as Super Lawyers in 2016 included Douglas Feldman, Daniel Finerty, Thomas Mackenzie, Gary Marsack, Jonathan Swain and Oyvind Wistrom.  The list of Rising Stars (under 40 years old or less than ten years of practice) included Chelsie Springstead.

TEXAS COURT ISSUES NATIONWIDE INJUNCTION, BARRING THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR’S PERSUADER RULE

By: Thomas W. Mackenzie

Yesterday (November 16, 2016), the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas issued a permanent injunction barring enforcement of the U.S. Department of Labor’s “Persuader Advice Exemption Rule.”  As we have reported in previous E-Alerts, this rule would have required employers and their attorneys to report expenditures incurred in resisting union organizing efforts.  Historically, reporting was only required when a law firm engaged in active persuader activity such as giving a speech to the employer’s employees in a union organizing drive.  Under the new rules, an attorney would be required to report if he or she engaged in speech writing, letter drafting or supervisor training. The rule was unquestionably designed to discourage law firms from representing employers in union organizing campaigns.

In arguing that the law was unlawful, the plaintiffs claimed, in part, that the reporting requirements invaded the attorney-client privilege.  The Texas judge issued a preliminary injunction on June 27, 2016.  The injunction was made permanent by the decision issued yesterday.  The decision will unquestionably be appealed.  However, it is unlikely that a decision at the appellate level will be issued before President Elect Trump takes office and a new Secretary of Labor is appointed.

The new requirement was challenged in multiple court cases by business groups and, in a case currently pending in Minnesota, by the Worklaw Network, an association of management-side labor and employment law firms of which Lindner & Marsack is the Wisconsin representative.

Although it is impossible these days to predict anything with certainty, the so-called “Persuader Rule” would appear to be in critical condition and unlikely to be enforced in the foreseeable future, if ever.

EMPLOYERS TO BEGIN USING REVISED FORM I-9

November 14, 2016

By:  Laurie A. Petersen and Samantha J. Wood

Today, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) published a revised version of the Employment Eligibility Verification Form I-9.  While this revised form is available now for use, employers may continue using the March 2013 version until January 21, 2017.  After January 21, 2017, employers MUST use the revised form, available at: https://www.uscis.gov/i-9

The revised Form I-9 is much more user-friendly, containing the following changes:

  • Electronic buttons that allow users to: access the full instructions, print the form, and clear the form to start over.
  • Electronic buttons that provide drop down instructions.
  • Prompts and validations to ensure information is entered correctly.
  • Drop down lists and calendars.
  • Section 1 asks for “other last names used” rather than “other names used.”
  • Additional space to allow the entry of multiple preparers and translators and an additional box labeled “I did not use a preparer or translator.”
  • A supplemental page for the preparer/translator.
  • A dedicated area for including additional information rather than having to add it in the margins.
  • The removal of the requirement that immigrants authorized to work provide both their Form I-94 number and foreign passport information.
  • A new “Citizenship/Immigration Status” field.
  • A quick response (QR) code, which is automatically generated when the employer prints the form.

If you have questions about this material, please contact Laurie A. Petersen or Samantha J. Wood by email at lpetersen@lindner-marsack.com or swood@lindner-marsack.com, or any other attorney you have been working with here at Lindner & Marsack, S.C.

Governor Walker Officially Proclaims November 14-18 Kids’ Chance Awareness Week

Kids’ Chance of Wisconsin, a non-profit organization that provides scholarships to children of seriously injured workers in Wisconsin, got a nod from Governor Scott Walker’s office with the official proclamation of November 14-18 as Kids’ Chance Awareness Week in Wisconsin.

Lindner & Marsack, S.C., along with other partners, helped establish Kids’ Chance in Wisconsin in 2013. Lindner & Marsack shareholder Douglas Feldman is a founding board member and Kids’ Chance of Wisconsin president. “When the family of a child in Wisconsin is affected by a serious workplace injury, we work to ensure that child is still able to pursue and achieve their educational goals,” Feldman says.

Kids’ Chance Wisconsin is the statewide affiliate of the national Kids’ Chance organization. Kids’ Chance Awareness Week is designed to increase visibility through special outreach events that help spread the word about Kids’ Chance scholarship opportunities. For more information about Kids’ Chance Wisconsin visit http://kidschanceofwi.org/.

Final Rule Implementing Executive Order Mandating Paid Sick Leave by Federal Contractors Published

By Jerilyn Jacobs

Last week, the Department of Labor published a Final Rule regarding implementation of Executive Order 13706, which requires certain federal contractors to provide paid sick leave to their employees.  The Final Rule applies to contracts where the solicitation was issued or the contract was awarded on or after January 1, 2017.

Under the Final Rule, applicable federal contractors will be required to provide employees with one hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked on or in connection with a covered federal contract, up to 56 hours.  Employees may use paid sick leave for the following reasons:

  • To care for the employee’s own illness and other health care needs, including preventative health care;
  • To care for a family member who is ill or needs health care, including preventative health care (the Final Rule takes an expansive view of the types of family relationships that are covered, extending beyond individuals with biological or legal ties to the employee); and
  • For purposes related to being the victim of domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking, or assisting a family member or loved one who is such a victim.

The four major types of federal contracts that fall under the Final Rule are procurement contracts for construction covered by the Davis-Bacon Act (DBA), service contracts covered by the McNamara-O’Hara Service Contract Act (SCA), concessions contracts, including any concessions contracts excluded from the SCA by the Department of Labor’s regulations at 29 CFR 4.133(b), and contracts in connection with federal property or lands and related to offering services for federal employees, their dependents, or the general public.

The Executive Order and Final Rule do not apply to contracts for the manufacturing or furnishing of materials, supplies, articles, or equipment to the federal government that are subject to the Walsh-Healy Public Contracts Act (PCA).  However, where a PCA-covered contract involves a substantial and segregable amount of construction work that is subject to the DBA, employees whose wages are governed by the DBA or the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), including those who qualify for an exemption from the FLSA’s minimum wage and overtime provisions, are covered for the hours spent performing work on or in connection with such DBA-covered construction work.

As to employees working on contracts covered by a collective bargaining agreement (CBA), if the CBA already provided the employee with at least 56 hours of paid sick time per year, then the other requirements of the Executive Order and the Final Rule do not apply to the employee until the date the CBA terminates or January 1, 2020, whichever is first.  If the CBA provides less than 56 hours or seven days, in cases where the CBA refers to days rather than hours, the contractor must provide covered employees with the difference between the amount provided under the CBA and 56 hours in a manner consistent with the Executive Order and Final Rule or the terms and conditions of the CBA.

The Final Rule also provides that employees can carry over up to 56 hours of unused paid sick leave from year to year while they work for the same contractor on covered contracts. Further, contractors are required to reinstate employees’ accrued, unused sick leave if the employee returns to work within 12 months after a job separation, unless the employee was paid for unused sick leave upon separation.

Employees can use as little as an hour of paid sick leave at a time.  An employee’s request to use paid sick leave may be made orally or in writing.  Advance notice can be required where the need for leave is foreseeable, and a contractor can require supporting documentation if the employee is absent three or more consecutive full days.

For further reference, the Final Rule may be found at https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/09/30/2016-22964/establishing-paid-sick-leave-for-federal-contractors

 

Wisconsin Among 21 States to Challenge DOL’s New Overtime Rules

By Sally A. Piefer

With less than 90 days before the Department of Labor’s new white collar overtime rules take effect, Wisconsin is among a group of 21 states challenging the Final Rule.

On May 18, 2016, the Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued Final Rules changing the eligibility for overtime for employees falling in the executive, administrative or professional exemptions. The Final Rule more than doubles the minimum salary necessary for an employer to consider a particular job exempt from overtime, increasing the salary threshold from $23,600 to $47,476 annually ($913 per week). In addition, the Final Rule provides for automatic indexing of the minimum salary threshold every three years. This new “salary” test is expected to affect approximately 4.2 million U.S. employees who are currently considered exempt. The Final Rule was set to take effect on December 1, 2016.

The lawsuit, filed yesterday in federal court in Texas, charges that the DOL failed to analyze the type of work that an employee is doing in these exempt classifications and simply determined that the amount of salary received by the employee was the best indicator of whether the employee fit within one of the exemptions. The DOL, the lawsuit claims, failed to consider any changes to the duties tests because those changes would have been “more difficult.”  They charge that salary should not be used as a “proxy” for duties and that employees who satisfy the duties portion of the test should still be considered exempt. In addition, the States challenge the automatic indexing because the use of automatic indexing is “without specific Congressional authorization” and is therefore invalid. Instead, if the DOL wants to use automatic indexing, the Plaintiff States say this process should go through the normal administrative agency notice and comment rulemaking process.

In addition, the lawsuit states that the payment of overtime to employees who will no longer be eligible to be considered exempt would force not only state and local governments – but also private employers – to substantially increase labor costs. Unlike private businesses, the Plaintiff States allege that state and local governments have fewer discretionary funds available and therefore have less ability to reduce costs or increase revenue. The result of the Final Rule, they claim, will force state and local governments to reduce or eliminate essential government services and functions.

The Plaintiff States allege that the Final Rule violates the 10th Amendment. The Tenth Amendment, a section of the Bill of Rights, essentially says that any power that is not given to the federal government is given to the people or the states. The States say that compliance with the Final Rule will impair the States’ ability to run their governments because of the huge impact the Final Rule will have on their respective budgets. The States ask the Court to declare the Final Rule invalid. At this point, the Plaintiff States have not sought immediate injunctive relieve preventing the rule from taking effect on December 1, 2016, but perhaps that will come as the deadline draws closer.

Other states joining Wisconsin in the lawsuit are Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah.

Shortly after this lawsuit was filed, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and fifty different business groups also filed suit in federal court in Texas challenging the Final Rule. The Chamber’s lawsuit also alleges that the Final Rule disqualifies millions of employees from the executive, administrative, and professional employee exemption and that “the new salary threshold is no longer a plausible proxy for the categories exempted from the overtime requirement.”  The lawsuit also argues that the automatic update to the salary threshold every three years without rulemaking or seeking input from stakeholders is not authorized under the law.

Lindner & Marsack, S.C. will continue to keep you posted on further developments. However, in the interim, you should proceed as though the Final Rule will take effect on December 1, 2016, so that you are not scrambling or putting your business in jeopardy of running afoul of the Final Rule.

For more information about the DOL’s new overtime exemption rules or your general employment law needs, please contact Attorney Sally Piefer at (414) 226-4818 or spiefer@lindner-marsack.com or any of the other attorneys you work with at Lindner & Marsack, S.C.